Health

What Is Supportive Therapy?

 

For many people with mental health conditions, treatment can be difficult. You may feel alone, misunderstood, and scared. But you are not alone and there are people who care about you. You don’t have to go it alone. Mental health care is more accessible than ever before. Supportive therapy gives you the support you need to manage your mental health condition and regain your quality of life.

Supportive therapy is a type of mental health care that helps you deal with your mental illness and improve your social interactions and day-to-day functioning. It can be offered alone or in combination with other treatments. It may involve one person or a group of people who work with you to support you during your recovery. It may take place once a week, once a month, or on an as-needed basis. This article gives you an overview of what supportive therapy is, why it may be beneficial, and examples of where you might find supportive therapy.

What is Supportive Therapy?

Supportive therapy is a type of mental health care that helps you deal with your mental illness and improve your social interactions and day-to-day functioning. It can be offered alone or in combination with other treatments. It may involve one person or a group of people who work with you to support you during your recovery. It may take place once a week, once a month, or on an as-needed basis. This article gives you an overview of what supportive therapy is, why it may be beneficial, and examples of where you might find supportive therapy.

Supportive therapy is not psychotherapy, which is a type of talk therapy that helps you identify, understand, and change the causes of your mental health conditions. Psychotherapy is most effective when it’s combined with medication, other treatments, and healthy lifestyle habits such as sleep hygiene and exercise.

Why Is Supportive Therapy Important?

You may feel like everyone else has their life together and you don’t know how you’ll ever get better. But you do get better. Supportive therapy can help you gain confidence, feel supported, and develop healthier coping mechanisms. This can reduce your symptoms, improve your relationships, and allow you to get back to work, school, and other activities that are important to you.

Examples of Supportive Therapy

– Weekly phone calls from a peer support coordinator: People who have experience supporting others with a similar illness may be able to help you navigate some of the challenges you might face, such as managing your symptoms or finding support groups that are relevant to you.

– Weekly self-help groups: Groups and self-help materials can be an essential part of supportive therapy. You can learn new ways to cope with and manage your symptoms, find support from others, see that you’re not alone, and get answers to questions you might have.

– One-on-one therapy: Having a therapist who is responsive and supportive can make a big difference in how you feel. You can open up and talk about things that are important to you—whether it’s work issues, feelings about your illness, or how you want to move forward in your life. You may also ask questions or seek advice on topics like finding a job, moving forward after a diagnosis, or how to improve your relationships.

How to Find Supportive Therapy

There are many ways to find supportive therapy: – Ask your doctor or other health care provider if they know of any therapists in your area. You can also search online using keywords such as “clinical psychologist” or “mental health therapist.”

– Attend support groups for people with similar mental health conditions. You can also find these groups online or in your area.

– Talk to friends, family members, colleagues, and others you trust who have a similar experience to yours. You may be surprised by who is willing to listen and help.

– If you don’t feel comfortable talking to others, consider therapy online with a virtual therapist.

Make the Most of Your Supports

Support is important in any kind of therapy, but it’s especially important when you’re receiving supportive therapy. You may want to do the following to make the most of your supports: –Interpersonal Therapy Ask your therapist what you can expect. Some therapists may be better suited for you than others. If you’re not happy with what you’re getting, ask your therapist for help.

– Keep your therapist informed about your treatment plan, medications, and other supports you’re already receiving. This can help your therapist make better recommendations and coordinate care with other providers.

– Make an effort to keep your therapist informed about your day-to-day activities, work, or school progress. This can help your therapist give you the support you need and offer you suggestions on how to improve your situation.

– Be honest with your therapist. It can be helpful to bring things up that you usually would discuss with your doctor, such as whether you feel better if you take your medications as prescribed or if you experience any side effects.

– When you feel frustrated with your therapist or don’t like what you’re getting, remember to take care of yourself first. This may include reminding yourself to take breaks, eating a snack, opening a window, taking a walk, etc.

– Keep your therapist informed about any changes in your treatment plan, medications, or side effects. This can help your therapist coordinate care and monitor your progress.

Is Your Therapist a Good Match for You?

Supportive therapy can be a necessary part of recovery, but it may not work for everyone. While it’s important to find someone who is responsive and supportive, you may also want someone who is knowledgeable about your particular mental health condition and can provide you with the best care possible. You may want to: – Check if your therapist is board-certified in your specific mental health condition. While there are some non- board-certified therapists, they may not have the same level of expertise.

– Ask your therapist if they have experience treating people with your specific diagnosis.

– Ask your therapist how they would like you to communicate if you prefer to do so. Some people prefer to communicate with family members and friends in person, while others prefer to communicate by phone.

– Be mindful of any costs before you decide to stop treatment, let your therapist down, or choose another option.

– Remember, you are allowed to change therapists if you feel like the one you are currently seeing is not the right fit for you.

Bottom line

Supportive therapy can be a helpful part of any recovery plan. While it’s important to find someone who is responsive and supportive, it’s also important to find someone who is knowledgeable about your mental health condition and can provide you with the best care possible. Motivational Enhancement Therapy You may want to: – Check if your therapist is board-certified in your specific mental health condition. While there are some non- board-certified therapists, they may not have the same level of expertise.

– Ask your therapist if they have experience treating people with your specific diagnosis

Why is supportive psychotherapy a basic technique?

The goal of supportive psychotherapy is to reduce or lessen the intensity of the symptoms, discomfort or incapacity felt or present. It also reduces the extent of behavioral disturbances caused by conflict or mental disorders of the patient.

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